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Publisher/Editor: H. D. Cheek, Sr. aka "Dr. Rigormortis” _ V2N2: February, 1992 

THE WORLD SCANNER REPORT f-MioW 

k Journal of VHF-UHF Scanner Technology i Engineering 


Published at: COHHtronics Engineering; PO BOX 262478; San Diego, CA 92196 


ECONOMICAL CELLULAR DATA DECODER NOW AVAILABLE! 

If your computer has a serial COMM port, you can now 
detect, decode and display Cellular Mobile Telephone 
control data! Read continuous data from the control 
channels as well those "bzzzt's” on the voice channels: 
hand-off freqs, power changes, phone numbers & more! An 
in-depth review of the Digital Data Interpreter will 
appear in a coming issue but you can contact the supplier 
for info now: CCS; PO Box 11191; Milwaukee, Wl 53211 

AN EDITORIAL POSITION 

My writing isn’t as philosophical like it was when I was 
younger. Maybe I needed to see my opinions in print and 
it didn't hurt when people agreed with them. Now I don't 
give much of a hoot. I am comfortable with a few opinions 
and convictions now. On the other hand, the "WORLD 
SCANNER REPORT" is on a rising star, having survived its 
first year. Perhaps it would be proper to share with you 
some of my foundations and to set an editorial slant for 
the next couple of years. Bear with me for a page, after 
which we'll get on with hacking and having fun! 

Family and consanguinity with my Creator are #1 on my 
list but these are personal and would bore you to tears. 
You may be interested in my belief and support of a Free 
World headed by a Free and Strong North America. The 
apparent dissolution of communism suggests Freedom may 
soon ring around the world. Maybe the "Millennium" has 
arrived. But I don’t trust it. Not yet, anyway. 

As a child of the 50's, I saw the USSR’s Nikita Kruschev 
on TV addressing the United Nations. He pointed a long, 
bony finger straight into the camera AT ME and snarled 
that I and MY children would live under his red flag. 
Kruschev's word directed the course of my Life, because I 
reared my five children on Patrick Henry's battle cry: 
"Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death." And so it is, we 
Cheek's are freeborn men and women and we will die free; 
whether sooner or later, doesn't matter. Given a choice 
of only one, Freedom or Peace, we choose Freedom. Amen. 

I believe there to be three essential & vital ingredients 
to the preservation of Social and Individual Freedom: 
Right to Keep and Bear Arms (Defense) 

Right to Move Self & Goods (Transportation) 

Freedom of Speech (Communication) 

These emulate the components of the most highly evolved 
living entity on earth: the Human Body's anti body/immune 
system (defense); motor control system (transportation); 
and the circulatory/nourishment & brain/nervous systems 
(communication). We would do well to emulate nature's 
success if we are to remain free and highly evolved! 


Copyright (c) 1991-2 <A11 Rights Reserved) _ U.H 

While others combat erosion of our rights of defense and 
transportation, my vocation keenly focuses on the arts 
and sciences of communications; particularly writing and 
radio. One cannot do it all, but "in union, there is 
strength". I think communication is the most potent 
attribute of a highly evolved, free spirit. Freedom of 
Speech means to me: effective, complete, efficient, 
detailed, timely, and accurate communications by which 
is conveyed what may be the most important commodity in 
the Universe: knowledae . The pen versus the sword? 

Radio communications is one of mankind's most important 
developments of the modern era and will likely remain so 
until telepathy and ESP replace it. The "WORLD SCANNER 
REPORT" is a contribution to the advancement of the 
science and art of RECEIVING, which, you see, is exactly 
one half of the process of communication and not any less 
important than transmitting. Alas, receiving is the 
forgotten half more often than not, and especially so 
beyond the worlds of passive shortwave listening and 
scanning. WE KNOW HOW IMPORTANT RECEIVING is, but the 
emphasis seems on transmitting: i.e., few listeners in a 
world of talkers. 

Radio mfgrs seem ever behind the times on this scene as 
technology creeps its way down to the consumer level. 
There are good reasons for this, but the vacuum that 
exists between the head end of high technology and the 
hobby radio level creates a bona fide position that I can 
fill and thereby be of unique service to both the SUPPLY 
and the DEMAND ends of the market. 

I really like what I am doing here: being at the service 
of others and having fun at it at the same time. To be 
active in the preservation of a Free Society; to convey 
information and knowledge; to help others acquire and 
amass knowledge; and to facilitate others' pleasure and 
enjoyment are what I was put here to do. If monitoring 
offers you not only entertainment and pleasure, but also 
knowledge, security, and a sense of being in the life 
blood of your community, then you and I are playing in 
harmony to the Cosmic Maestro's symphony. 

It's conceivable that our radio skills can save lives; be 
inestimable assets to partisan resistance teams against a 
foreign aggressor (God forbid); enable us to render aid 
to our communities in event of hurricane, tornado, earth¬ 
quake or conflagration. This total concept is what the 
"WSR" and I are all about. The vehicle for what we do is 
fun, pleasure and amusement, but our objectives are 
deadly serious in a most deadly game. Forces lurk, even 
now, that would deprive us of our liberty if given half a 
chance. Eternal vigilance is the price of Freedom, but 
damnit, are we bargain hunting here? En garde! 73/bc 



DO-IT-YOURSELF FEATURE PRESENTATION 
::: THE FATMAN COMPUTER INTERFACE 
Concluded from last month By: "Professor Peabody" 

This month wraps up the FatMan Computer Interface with a 
technical discussion of each part followed by operating, 
setup & alignment procedures and concluding with needed 
schematic diagrams and then a discussion of the optional 
separate and independent REMOTE CONTROL. 

FATHAN KEYBOARD INTERFACE 

This is the easiest circuit to explain as it's only two 
74HC4051 chips. A binary code from the FatMan Computer 
Interface (or Remote Control unit) appears at the DB1, 

DB2, DB4, DB8 & DB16 inputs and a Key Enter (KE) pulse 

goes low which enables the 4051's and closes two CMOS 
switches inside the chips to simulate the action of a 

keypress on the scanner's key board. The diodes offer 

isolation from the keyboard to the circuit and must not 
be omitted. The 10-k resistors and the ,1-uF caps add 
noise suppression and pull down the CMOS chip inputs to 
ground when nothing is plugged into the DB-9 connector. 
This small board MUST go inside the scanner as close to 
the scanner's Keyboard Connector as possible. See pg-8 
of last month’s "lYSR” for illustration and details. 

COMPUTER INTERFACE 

Eight data bits from the computer come in via the DB-25 
connector, Pins 2-9, and are latched in an octal latch, 
U-1, by the STB signal. The data then go to the Code 

Converter, shown as "U-2" on pages 9 & 10 last month. 

This data comes out of the Code Converter as the B0-B4 

signals. The codes are then applied to buffers at U-3 

and sent on to the keyboard interface. The STB signal is 
delayed 10-usec by U-4a and then stretched by U-4b. Pulse 
stretching is necessary to closely emulate a press of the 
scanner’s keys. The widened pulse goes to an OR gate, 
U-7, and on to a buffer, U-3, to become the KEY ENTER 
(KE) pulse. The delay ensures that the Code Converter 
has enough time to accurately process the ASCII codes to 
Interface codes needed to program the scanner. The STB 
signal also creates two other signals needed to handshake 
with the computer. STB is applied to U-5a and outputs a 
high BUSY signal which tells the computer to wait and not 
send data until it goes low. When BUSY goes low, U-5b 
triggers to output a 10-usec ACK pulse to acknowledge the 
received data and ask the computer for another byte. Now 
this all works very fine but each character is processed 
whether the interface uses it or not. You see, along with 
numerical data can also come spaces and other irrelevant 
characters & printer commands that we don't want to be 
processed by the Code Converter. The process could be 
slowed appreciably, when we want turbo-SPEED!!! 

That’s where other circuitry comes into play. The L9-L13 
signals are fed to an OR gate circuit to detect all data 
zeros. U-6a, b, c & d are zero detectors. This is great 
because unwanted data are coded to be processed as zeros. 
Desirable data will put a high or a 'T at the output of 


U-6, Pin 11, which goes on to the inverter U-10, and puts 
a "1" to the OR gate U-7, Pin 2. A T then comes out of 
U-7, Pin 3, to prevent the KEY ENTER signal from going 
low that would normally cause a keypress at the scanner. 
At the same time U-6, Pin 11 sends a "0" to U-7, Pin 4 
that removes a "1" from the output at Pin 6 of U-7. This 
removes the "1" from the control gate of U-9, Pin 13, 
that shuts off the CMOS gate and removes 5 volts from the 
500-k trimmer that is used to set the BUSY pulse width. 
Then the ZERO DETECT is sent to the inverter U-10, Pin 1, 
to come out inverted as a 'T and which goes on to the 
AND gate U-8, Pin 1. This in conjunction with a "1" on 
U-8, Pin 2 from the switch being in the FAST mode creates 
a "1” at the output of U-8, Pin 3 which now puts a "1" at 
the control pin of U-9, Pin 5, that turns on the CMOS 
switch and puts +5v to the 1-k resistor (R-19) & changes 
the time constant of the 1-shot U-5a. This shortens up 
the time the BUSY pulse is at a "1", which in turn causes 
the interface to process useless data faster. When a 
desired byte of data comes in, the ZERO DETECTOR detects 
it and reverses the control pins of the CMOS switches and 
puts a longer time constant into the "1" shot U-5a that 
slows down the data transfer to the scanner. So the 
interface constantly flips back and forth during 
programming to slow down for good data and speed up for 
unwanted data. A 25$ increase in speed is realized by 
the speedup circuit. Set the switch to the SLOW position 
and watch the LEDs for activity and listen for the 
scanner's beeps when a keypress is actuated. You will 
note a lot of time with no beeps, meaning no programming 
is going on. This is wasted time which is munched by the 
speedup circuit. The SLOW function of the switch is used 
for initial setup and alignment of the interface. Later, 
it can be left in the FAST position for TURBO speeds. 

A PRO-2006 CPU is installed in my PRO-2005 with two Clock 
crystals that can be switched. The stock 12 MHz rock 
gives 30-ch/sec and a 16 MHz crystal provides 40 ch/sec. 
A faster crystal also shortens the programming time by 
the same percentage that the SCAN speed is increased. So 
if you want max program speed, use a faster crystal and 
align the Interface for this speed. If then used at the 
slower scanner speed the radio won’t program at all and 
just gives an error to mean, "What are you doing, 
Chester?" The FatMan will work with all PRO-2004/5/6 
scanners at whatever CPU speed mod may be installed. 

It bugged me when my Search & Store Module (MOD-23b) 
wouldn't work with the stock PRO-2005 CPU and a 10 MHz. 
crystal. That's why I had two crystals in there: a stock 
7.37 MHz rock for the S & S module and a 10 MHz rock for 
speed. So, if properly aligned, the FATMAN will work at 
most any speed and give 100$ error free data programming. 

CODE CONVERTER 

Here's a fun circuit: a do-it-yourself, Programmable Read 
Only Memory, (PROM). Instead of a hard-programmed chip 
with a special proprietary code, you build it in the 
privacy of your inner sanctum. Add or remove ordinary, 
cheap switching diodes to program this baby. Yes, a 


"THE WORLD SCANNER REPORT" (c) 1991-2; V2N2 - February, 1992; Page 2 



little work here, but you don't have to understand EPROMs 
and have a $750 EPROM programmer. The Code Converter is 
an 80 address by 5 bit memory. The FatMan does not use 
the lower 32 addresses, so I left out two 45H chips that 
would normally be for the first 32 addresses, but most of 
the upper 48 are used to send codes to the scanner. 

A 7-bit ASCII character from the computer enters on the 
A0 through A6 input lines. A single output from U-2a,b 
or c goes high and forward biases a column of diodes in 
the matrix. As the anode of each diode is pulled high it 
also pulls the corresponding B0 thru B4 outputs high and 
a specific code goes to the Keyboard Interface in the 
scanner to emulate a key stroke. The lower 4 bits of 
addressing is put to all three decoder chips U-2a, b & c, 
but it's U-2d that selects which one of the decoder chips 
will be on. Note the outputs of U-2d, y2, y3 & y4 (pins 
11-13) are used but y0 & yl (pins 14-15) are not. These 
are for the missing two chips for the lower 32 addresses. 
There are five 47-k resistors (R10-14, p9, V2N1) to grnd 
at the outputs of the Code Converter . These resistors 
pull the output levels to a low when the diodes are off. 
This is very important for two reasons. (1) CMOS inputs 
cannot float or be unconnected. (2) The ZERO-DETECT 
always looks for zeros to speed up the action. I added 
two extra functions that are not needed for programming 
but can be used to put the radio into MANUAL at Ch-1 for 
instance; a good example of how to add functions. 

The two missing decoders mentioned above would be for 
addresses 0 to 15 and 16 to 31. The first address of 
U-2a is 32 at Pin 11, which is not used; address 36 at 
Pin 7 is the first one used followed by address 37 at Pin 
6 and then address 46 at Pin 16 (only 3 address outputs 
of U-2a are used). The actual address number equates to 
the binary number of the incoming ASCII code. I used the 
$ symbol to represent the SCAN function. So when the $ 
symbol comes into the Code Converter, address 36 (Pin 7) 
goes high and turns on the two diodes tied to outputs B1 
and B2. B0, B3 and B4 stay low, so the binary output 
will be 0-0-1-1-0. B0 is the rightmost and B4 is the 
leftmost bit: B4-B3-B2-B1-B0 

Table 1 

CODE CONVERTER OUTPUT LINE CODE 

BINARY CODE BITS-) B4 B3 B2 B1 B0 
DECIMAL VALUE.> 16 8 4 2 1 

B4 B3 B2 B1 B0 Decimal Values 
EXAMPLE: 00110 = 0 + 0 + 4 + 2 + 0 = 6 

Given the code 00110 with B1 and B2 at a "1" state, add 
the binary weights to get 6. (11111 = 31). See Table 2 
for scanner keys versus binary numbers and note that a 6 
corresponds to the SCAN function. This is how the FATMAN 
converts ASCII to the code for programming. All other 
programming functions are decoded in the same manner. 
It's also how the Remote Control converts a remote key to 
a scanner key through only 8 wires. This way you don't 
need 30 wires to operate 29 key functions. 


Table 2 

ASCI I-TO-SCANNER KEY CODE TRANSLATION 

From Computer Scanner Code Converter 

!<—To U-2 Interface--)! Keypress j<— B0-B5 Output—)! 


ASCI 1 

ASCI 1 

BINARY 

Result At INTERFACE 

BINARY 

CHAR 

CODE 

CODE 

KEY 

CODE 

CODE 

$ 

36 

00100100 

SCAN 

6 

00110 

% 

37 

00100101 

MANUAL 

14 

01110 

, 

46 

00101110 

. (decimal) 

25 

11001 

0 

48 

00110000 

0 

26 

11010 

1 

49 

00110001 

1 

10 

01010 

2 

50 

00110010 

2 

9 

01001 

3 

51 

00110011 

3 

13 

01101 

4 

52 

00110100 

4 

2 

00010 

5 

53 

00110101 

5 

1 

00001 

6 

54 

00110110 

6 

5 

00101 

7 

55 

00110111 

7 

18 

10010 

8 

56 

00111000 

8 

17 

10001 

9 

57 

00111001 

9 

21 

10101 

A 

65 

01000001 

PROGRAM 

3 

00011 

D 

68 

01000100 

DELAY 

22 

10110 

E 

69 

01000101 

ENTER 

19 

10011 

F 

70 

01000110 

LIMIT 

12 

01100 

L 

76 

01001100 

LOCKOUT 

30 

11110 

M 

77 

01001101 

MODE 

16 

10000 




< SPEED 

0 

00000 




/ < UP ARROW 

4 

00100 

Not programmable / 

< L/0 RVW 

7 

00111 

from computer as / 

< PRIORITY 

8 

01000 

presently 

/ 

< DOWN ARROW 

20 

10100 

configured 

in \ 

< RESET 

23 

10111 

the Code Converter \ 

< STEP 

24 

11000 



\ 

< CLEAR 

27 

11011 

Can be used by the 

\ < DIRECT 

28 

11100 

Remote Controller... 

\< MONITOR 

31 

11111 




11 

, 15 & 29 not used 


ALIGNHENT/ADJUSTMENT 

Alignment is easy with just two trimmer potentiometers. 
Set both trimmers to maximum resistance and set the 
Interface to the SLOW mode. Set the scanner to an empty 
400 -ch Block or unimportant Banks for test and alignment, 
else what's there will be overwritten. Send a data file 
to the scanner (see the Software Section below) and you 
should see something happening on the LCD Display 
followed by an ERROR flag. Don't worry, this is correct. 
The KEY ENTER pulse is just too long. Slowly reduce the 
resistance of the PULSE WIDTH trimmer and you should see 
some meaningful frequencies appear on the Display and be 
stored. Continue adjusting the trimmer until the ERROR 
warning appears again. This is the minimum width of the 
KEY ENTER pulse. Turn the trimmer one half turn in the 
other direction and the ERROR should disappear. If not, 
turn a little more. Once the ERROR flag disappears, the 
trimmer should be set one half turn more from this point. 

Slowly adjust the BUSY trimmer toward minimum resistance. 


"THE WORLD SCANNER REPORT" (c) 1991-2; V2N2 - February, 1992; Page 3 








The beeps will increase in frequency and the numbers will 
appear faster on the display. Keep turning until the 
ERROR flag appears again. Turn back now until the ERROR 
disappears and continue for another half turn. That's it 
for the alignment! 

Select the FAST MODE and watch the numbers fly! But 
watch carefully for errors as indicated on the display. 
If there are any, select the SLOW MODE and increase the 
BUSY length slightly; then select the FAST MODE and try 
it again. If errors still arise, go to SLOW MODE and 
increase the PULSE WIDTH trimmer slightly and try again. 
When things finally seem ok, CLEAR the test Block to all 
zeros and start the database at the beginning and watch 
as all 400 channels are programmed in the FAST mode. If 
no errors are seen in 400 channels, CLEAR the Block and 
test it again. Repeat this for at least five more times 
to make sure the pulse widths are set properly. You are 
setting the pulse widths for maximum speed and absolutely 
no errors. After playing and having fun, shut everything 
off for at least two hours or overnight. Then power up 
the computer and scanner and as fast as you can, load up 
a database and reprogram your test Block and check again 
for errors. If none found, that’s great. You're done. 
If errors creep in, go back to SLOW MODE and make slight 
adjustments as described above. I have found that when 
the scanner is cold, the circuits may be a bit sluggish. 
This last adjustment will compensate for temperature 
variations. Of course, if you first adjust the circuit 
in a 95-degree room and four months later, program a 
Block in a 65-degree room, readjustment may be necessary. 
But this is normal. Make the adjustment when it's cold 
for worst case needs, and it should be the final one. 

SOMETHING TO REMEMBER: A peculiar thing about CMOS ICs 
is that the internal gates can be turned on by voltages 
at the inputs and outputs without +5v power at the supply 
pins! So follow the below sequence when hooking up and 
disconnecting the FatMan from the computer and scanner. 

(1) With the scanner OFF, connect FatMan to the scanner. 

(2) Turn the scanner ON. (3) Insert the DB-25 connector 
into the computer's parallel printer port. When finished 
programming, (1) remove the printer connector first and 
then (2) remove the DB-9 connector from the scanner. No 
damage has ever occurred to my computer or scanner but 
avoid any conditions where live signals can go to the 
Interface when it is not powered up The Interface will 
not be powered up if it is not connected to the scanner 
and/or when the scanner is turned OFF! Use Caution! 

SOFTWARE 

Software for the FatMan can be a simple ordinary Database 
Manager, Word Processor; even a Text Editor, for that 
matter, or a Spreadsheet. Any program that can send an 
ASCII file to a printer should work, though databases are 
obviously best suited for frequency management. I use a 
shareware database called FILE EXPRESS which is great for 
beginners but I will assume that you know how to use your 
database or other software and how to print files. The 
computer operates the FatMan as if it were a printer. 


A unique requirement here is that the frequency file to 
be sent to the Interface must have a certain layout that 
will be simplified from a normal frequency record. It 
should not be difficult to generate this simplified file 
from your regular frequency management file. 

For maximum utility and reference value, your database or 
other frequency file should have a minimum of four 
Fields, Categories or columns: Channel #; Frequency; 
Special Programing Codes and Coments. You may have as 
many as you like, but the scanner requires only two to 
four different Fields, depending. An example of the 
layout of a frequency database is given in Table 3. It 
has ten Fields of data or information for optimal use. 

Table 3 

TYPICAL FREQUENCY MANAGEMENT DATABASE FIELDS 




No. 


# 

NAME OF FIELD 

CHRS 

DESCRIPTION OF FIELD 

A. 

Wild Card Code: 

1-5 

Misc codes (FatMan!) 

B. 

Block #: 

2 

# Extended Memory Block 

C. 

Channel #: 

3 

Scanner Channel Number 

D. 

Frequency: 

9 

Frequency, 0158.9725 (MHz) 

E. 

Type Code: 

4 

Fed, State, LocGov, Business 

F. 

1 ,D. Code: 

4 

Police, Security, Sports, 

G. 

Location Code: 

3 

City, county or region 

H. 

Comments: 

25-50 

Self explanatory 

1 . 

Special Code: 

1-5 

Misc code requirements 

J. 

Sequence/Record #: 

3-4 

Consecutive number of entry 


Explanation of Table 3 

A. The Wild Card Code is not often used, but to have a 
Field previously defined for it when you need it can 
be very useful. The FatMan Programming Codes can go 
here perhaps, or in (I). 

B. Block Numbers are required for those scanners where 
Extended Memory is installed, such as the 6,400-Ch or 
25,600-Ch modifications. Not necessary for scanners 
with stock 400-ch memory. 

C. This is the memory channel number of where a freq is 
to be stored in the scanner. 

D. This Field is the frequency in MHz, in the format 
xxxx.xxxx with four decimal places for good measure. 
Don't forget the . (decimal point) in the frequency as 
the scanner requires it for entry. The frequency 
should appear in the file as it would normally be 
entered from the keyboard. 

E. Type Code defines the general nature of the frequency 
or user of that frequency. Example: FEDG for federal 
gov't; STAT for State Government; LOCG for Local 
Gov't; MILT for military; RAIL for railroads, etc. 

F. I.D. further defines the frequency or user of that 
frequency. Example: POLC for police; SPRT for 


"THE WORLD SCANNER REPORT" (c) 1991-2; V2N2 - February, 1992; Page 4 





Sports; BUSN for business; EMRG for emergency; MEDC 
for medical; SECI for security, investigators, etc. 

G. Location code for the city, county or region of the 
user of that frequency. Example: SDG for San Diego; 
RVR for Riverside; LAX for Los Angeles; MEX for 
Mexico, etc. 

H. Comments are your own description of that frequency, 
it's users, call signs, repeater info, etc. 

I. Special or misc codes for certain operations like 
culls & sorts, etc. Can be used for the FatMan, etc. 

J. Unique sequence or consecutive record number, assigned 
to each entry so that the entire database can be 
sorted back to its original order when desired. 

NOTE: Your frequency file can have as many Fields or 
Categories per record as you like; the only limit is what 
your software permits, and so the ten Fields described 
above are only an example; you can have more. The FatMan 
Interface will ordinarily use only TWO of the above 
Fields so study your particular software for ways to cull 
or separate the unneeded Fields from the ones required by 
the FatMan. Most databases and spreadsheets can do this. 

The FatMan will require certain letter codes to be sent 
with frequency data in order to PROGram a channel and 
advance to the next channel; and make MODE, DELAY, and 
other desired settings. In the above Table 3, you could 
use either (A) or (J), or in some instances BOTH, to hold 
and store the necessary FatMan programming codes. Note 
that only UPPER CASE is recognized by the FatMan. Lower 
case is ignored by the Code Converter. Table 4 shows the 
codes that will be most often used by the FatMan: 

Table 4 

COMMON SCANNER KEY & PROGRAMMING CODES 


A = PROGRAM 

$ = SCAN 

1 = 1 

6 = 6 

E = ENTER 

% = MANUAL 

2 = 2 

7 = 7 

D = DELAY 

L = LOCKOUT 

3 : 3 

8 = 8 

M = MODE 

F = LIMIT 

. = decimal 

4 = 4 

5 : 5 

9 = 9 
0 = 0 


I made the PROGRAM key to be represented by an A for 
"Advance" to make it easier to remember. The (M) MODE 
key (for NFM/WFM/AM) has to be entered the same number of 
times (1 or 2) as you would have to hit it to get a 
desired mode by programming from the keyboard. The SCAN 
($) and MAN {%) keys can be used to put the scanner in 
these modes after programming. The LIMIT key (F for 
FREQ) is used to load the ten SEARCH LIMITS in the 
PRO-2004/5/6. So, all you have to do is enter the key 
codes just as you would be from the keyboard. An example 
of programming LIMIT SEARCH is given in Table 7. 

Your database or other software will have a means to 
print a file and/or parts of a file. This is how we get 
the information to the scanner. Your primary file may be 


rather detailed like that shown in Table 3, but you have 
to cull, select or trim that file so that it resembles 
the middle two columns of Table 5. After the file has 
been sorted into a desired order, print it to a printer 
to see how it looks. Dates, headers, page no's, COMMENTS 
etc, have to be removed from the part to be printed to 
the scanner, because any numbers or upper case letters 
(EDMALF$$) will be processed by the FatMan at the wrong 
time and generally foul things up. So remove all the 
extra stuff and print it once to be sure. Now disk store 
a copy of the smoothed file with a name that makes sense, 
such as D0WNL0AD.TXT or DATADUMP.TXT etc. You might want 
to add one thing to the first line of your special 
download file: (A1A). This will put the scanner into 
the PROGRAM mode no matter what it was doing and preset 
Ch-1 ready to be programed. Of course, you can select 
another channel as a starting point, too. (A41A, etc) 

Table 5 

SAMPLE FATMAN CHANNEL PROGRAM 

* !<--Send This Data Only—>1 * 

1 PROGRAM 1 


CH 

FREQUENCY 

CODES 

COMMENTS 



A1A 

See text 

1 

0155.8500 

EDA 

Pol ice 

2 

0046.4600 

EDA 

Fire 

3 

0255.4000 

EDMMA 

Military 

4 

0162.5500 

EDLA 

Weather 

5 

0146.2900 

EDLA 

Ham Radio 

6 

1286.1275 

EA 

Ham Radio 

7 


LA 

Lockout 


* Don't send this data to the scanner 


In this example, (A) from Table 4 sets the PRGM function 
and advances the channel number from the present one to 
the next to ready it for programming. At Ch-3, (M) 
appears twice to set the mode to AM from the default of 
NFM. In Ch-4, (L) sets LOCKOUT so the weather channel is 
skipped when SCANning. Same with ch-5. If you want to 
lockout empty channels (Ch-7 above) just put "LA" in the 
PROGRAM CODE field with nothing in the frequency field. 

You will not ordinarily want to send channel numbers to 
the scanner once it is positioned to the desired starting 
channel number. This will only slow things down and/or 
create errors if not handled properly. So remove the 
CHAN Field before "printing" to the scanner. On the 
other hand, channel numbers CAN be included with the 
download if an "A" is inserted between the CHAN field and 
the frequency. Remember, the scanner is programmed by 
simulated keypresses, so whatever your fingers do can 
also be done by the computer. See Table 6 for an example 
if you want to send channel numbers to the scanner along 
with the rest of the data (except COMMENTS, of course): 

When consecutive channels are to be programed, it is best 
to send ONLY Frequency and Codes to the scanner since CH# 
is not needed and can only slow things down. The thing 


"THE WORLD SCANNER REPORT" (c) 1991-2; V2N2 - February, 1992; Page 5 









to understand here is the FINGER sequence of programming 
which must be emulated by the computer. Using the line 
for Ch-1 in Table 6 as an example, you would have to 
press: PRGM: 1 : PRGM : 155.85 : ENTER : DELAY : PRGIi . 

The computer will do the same thing with the sequence: 

A : 1 : A : 0155.8500 : E : D : A 

Table 6 

SAMPLE FATHAN PROGRAM WITH CHANNEL NO's 


A 


1 

A 

0155.8500 

EDA 

2 

A 

0046.4600 

EDA 

4 

A 

0162.5500 

EDLA 

6 

A 

1286.1275 

EA 

7 

A 


LA 


When a scanner Program File is working properly, you can 
go on to set up separate files for many 400-Ch Blocks, 
groups, or configurations, each with unique title, Block 
number, date, etc. Customize to your liking. You could 
have a blank template database for a Block of frequencies 
and then clone as many as you need (16, 64 or ?) with 
names such as BLOCKOO.FRQ; BLOCKOI.FRQ, etc. Otherwise, 
the main program might not sort the Blocks in numerical 
order the way you're used to seeing them. I found this 
out by accident so you won’t have to. Also, don't sort 
your main databases unless each record has a Sequence 
Number. Store the original database and then rename it 
as something to play with to get the hang of it. I had 
to reenter a whole database after sorting because it got 
all screwed up and couldn't be restored to the original 
order. You can avoid this by adding a separate Field for 
SEQUENCE it, and then assign a consecutive number to each 
record after it is in the order you like. For 400-Ch 
groups, the CHAN it Field may suffice for this purpose. 

A different database can be made to load up the ten LIMIT 
SEARCH banks with the upper and lower limits by using the 
A and the F keys in a manner as shown in Table 7: 

Table 7 

PROGRAMMING LIMIT SEARCH BANKS 


PRGM 

FREQUENCY 

PRGM 

FREQUENCY 

AIF 

0869.0000 

EDF 

0895.0000E 

A2 

0144.0000 

EF 

0148.0000E 

A3 

0225.0000 

EF 

0250.0000E 

A4 

0046.6100 

EF 

0047.0000E 


Finger press example of first line above: 

PRGM : I : LIM : 869.0 : ENTER : DELAY : LIM : 895.0 : ENTER 

In the first line "AIF" is used to put the scanner into 
PROGRAM mode then enter the frequency LIMIT mode in 
SEARCH BANK ttl. The "E” enters the frequency, then "F" 
changes the display to the upper LIMIT and then it is 
entered. The next line advances to SEARCH BANK #2 and 
then enters the frequencies as before. 


Operation of the FATMAN is very friendly because it uses 
ASCII text. Great things could be ahead because simple, 
homegrown BASIC programs can easily be written to operate 
the scanner and provide some useful operating tools. You 
programmers out there should get busy on writing some 
good software and share it with us. Hint-hint-hint! 

REMOTE CONTROLLER UNIT 

We're now at the final and optional stage of the project. 
The Remote Controller is a handheld, 29-function keypad 
on one end of a shielded 9 wire cable. The 29 keys are 
arranged in an order to emulate the scanner's keypad. I 
built mine for maximum comfort while operating my radio 
and it has since become a major addition to my station. 
It is second in necessity only to my JIM M-100 preamp. 

I try to employ common 1C chips in most of my projects, 
instead of custom programmed or exotic and hard-to-find 
stuff. I find it very annoying to get all heated up on a 
project and then discover that a chip is very costly or 
requires a catalog search that only Indiana Jones could 
undertake. So, I will knowingly design a circuit with 
four chips that could be replaced with one PLA or an 
EPROM. Only a minority of hobbyists would be able to 
program them, though. This takes us to the Remote 
Control Unit conclusion of the FatMan project. 

At the heart of the circuit are the four 74HC148 Priority 
Encoder chips. They are cascaded so that only one input 
at a time will cause only one output to change. The GS 
outputs, Pin 14, are ANDed together at U6b to develop the 
KEY ENTER signal that is sent to the Keyboard Interface 
in the scanner which makes the CMOS switches simulate key 
presses. KE also lights an LED to show that a key was 
successfully processed. The A0, A1 and A2 signals are 
encoded for the proper binary number to be sent to the 
Keyboard Interface. At the top of the schematic under 
each named key is the decimal equivalent of each key. 

Let's use the 9 key as an example. The decimal number of 
the 9 key is 21 which converted to binary is 10101. The 
bit weight of 1 is the rightmost digit. So when the 9 
key is pressed three things happen: the KE LED lights; 
the binary number 10101 appears on the five datalines and 
is sent to the Keyboard Interface; and the KEY ENTER 
signal goes low (zero) to enable the dual 4051's in the 
Keyboard Interface to turn on the correct CMOS switches 
and emulate a keypress action. All this happens at the 
same time so there will not be a time lag when a Remote 
Key is pressed. SWITCH NOTE: Cheap momentary push¬ 
button switches are not recommended! Radio Shack carries 
such switches but they're noisy and bouncy. Also, 30 of 
the little suckers are costly. However, I found a better 
switch, actually a computer type, with no bounce or noise 
and very low cost! Made by PANASONIC and sold by 
DIGI KEY, part numbers P8006S thru P8016S, this series 
comes in varying styles & sizes. See the DIGI KEY catalog 
for your choices before you buy. At 21-23 cents apiece 
they're a bargain. Get a few extra for spares, just in 
case. DIGIKEY PHONE (800) 344-4539. 


"THE WORLD SCANNER REPORT" (c) 1991-2; V2N2 - February, 1992; Page 6 





The Remote cable terminates at a DB-9 female connector 
just like the Computer Interface. Wiring is the same, 
too. Note that Pin 8 is a spare for any extra function 
you may want. Wiring errors/blown chips are about the 
only nasty ambushes in store for the unwary, so standard 
CMOS construction & wiring care will minimize trouble. 
Faster CPU clock crystals may cause the Remote Unit to 
not operate properly. A PRO-2006 CPU is planted in my 
2005 with a 16 MHz crystal to go 40 cps. I tried 18 MHz 
for 45 cps warp-speed but the CPU wouldn't respond to 
Remote Key commands. I replaced the 16 MHz rock and it 
worked fine. Before the CPU was replaced, 10 MHz worked 
just fine with the Remote but not the Search and Store 
module. Speed is the only known incompatibility. You’re 
strongly warned against crystals above 16 MHz in the 
PRO-2006 or above 10 MHz in the PRO-2004/5. 

CLOSING NOTE: If you want only the Remote Controller and 
not the FatMan Computer Interface, then you need only the 
Remote Unit and the Keyboard Interface. If you want the 
FatMan Interface, but not the Remote Unit, then you need 
just the Keyboard Interface and the Computer Interface. 
If you want both, so much the better! The Remote Unit 
plugs into the same DB-9 on the rear of the scanner as 
the Computer Interface. Obviously, you can't use both at 
the same time, but then who'd want to? Prof. Peabody 

[ EDITOR'S I YRAPUP: Compliments and thanks to the good 
Professor for his fine article and design. I can imagine 
the hours of design, testing, debugging and writing this 
project must have required. We probably owe the Prof's 
wife and children a round of applause, as well, for their 
patience and support. And, thank YOU READERS for your 
patience and support! Many of you may not be interested 
in this extensive of a project right now, though I see 
when many will undertake this venture someday. The info 
will be waiting for when you're ready. Subsequent issues 
will contain hints and updates on the FatMan to make Life 
easier when you feel the time is right. Interfaces for 
scanners are here to stay and are not going to go away! 

The FatMan looks like a real "hairy" project, but after 
careful review and editing, my conclusion is that its 
bark is worse than its bite. You see, it's mostly an 
external project; very little hacking and invasion of the 
scanner required. The part that resides in the scanner 
(Keyboard Interface) is simple and virtually fool-proof! 
The external Computer Interface Unit and/or Remote Unit 
are not the simplest circuits in the world, but the fact 
that they're outside the scanner counts for a lot! This 
means minimal risk of damage to the scanner! You can 
take your time, days if you like, without tying up your 
valuable scanner! The FatMan may be an ideaI project for 
the PRO-2004/5/6 scannist who is a fair hand at hacking 
and circuit building. In closing the FatMan Project, let 
me direct your attention to the bonus page 12 in this 
issue for a System Block Diagram that shows how it all 
goes together. The Professor and I will provide limited 
technical support for those who take the plunge and run 
into snags. If you're not in the mood for the FatMan, 


perhaps the RIN Systems' or Datametrics' Interfaces, as 
reviewed last month, might be for you. If none of these 
are appealing, stay tuned; two or three more interfaces 
may be introduced in the coming months. Hopefully, there 
will be something for everyone in due time. 73/bc] 

REVIEW OF ICOM 2SRA & 4SRA from GEnie Information Systems 

Radio RoundTable BBS; page 200 Category 4, Topic 32 
Message 152 Mon, Nov 04, 1991 at 22:21 EST 
By: Stuart Logan, N7QYJ (Edited for clarity/brevity) 

Many folks waited expectantly for the ICOM R-1 wideband 
receiver and were very disappointed by it’s deservedly 
bad reviews. There is an alternative wideband receiver; 
also an ICOM which has nearly the same number of channels 
and costs less. It has TWO receivers in one case and is 
the only wideband pocket receiver to support CTCSS tone 
squelch! Perhaps the biggest extra that you get is a 2 
meter or 70 cm amateur radio in the deal as well. This 
radio is the ICOM 2SRA (144 MHz) or 4SRA (440 MHz). 

Only slightly larger than the SAT series from which the 
R-1 is derived, these rigs have two receivers in a single 
chassis! One is the ham transceiver; 2-m or 70 cm. The 
2SRA's ham receiver covers 138-174 MHz (Rx) allowing full 
receiver coverage of the VHF public service bands. The 
2nd receiver is a wideband scanner with 50-905 MHz. It 
supports AM, NFM, & WFM, including FM radio & TV audio. 
This scanner side has 61 channels and one search bank. 
The transceiver section has 31 channels plus a search 
bank. Each also has a VFO which you can use as a scratch 
area or for storage. Tuning steps include 5. 10, 12.5, 
15, 20, 25, 30, or 50 khz. 

The LCD (the best I've seen) shows operating frequencies, 
S-meter, T-squelch, channel #, etc. The display may be 
backlit for 5 seconds or will remain on until you turn it 
off. The 2SRA and 4SRA have top-mounted volume & squelch 
controls. Also top-mounted is a tuning knob that changes 
freq in the VFO & search modes, and channel in the scan 
mode. Clocks are built-in which can turn the rigs on or 
off as well as display the time. CTCSS tone squelch is 
available in both radio's, allowing you to blank intermod 
& unwanted co-licensee's. The rig comes with a 1000 mAh 
battery pack (BP-84). The initial shipment contained the 
wrong battery pack and dealers are authorized to exchange 
for the correct battery to your radio. An 'empty' pack is 
available that allows use of NiCad or alkaline batteries. 
Scanning is supported in an 'up' or 'down' configuration. 
Delay (approx 2 sec) cannot be shut off. The keyboard & 
PTT switch can be locked out. A red/green LED indicates 
when the radio receives or transmits. An oddity about 
the SRA series is that each has two antennas! The ham 
transceiver has the appropriate single band BNC antenna. 
The wide-band receiver has an antenna with a 1/8" male 
plug on the end. Despite the strange connector, tests 
convinced me this antenna performs as well as any other. 
Also top-mounted are a 1/8” speaker/mike & earphone jack 
and a DC jack to charge/power the rig. The transceiver 
is capable of 1.5 to 5 watts output depending on battery 
or externally provided power. The rigs come with belt 


'7HE WORLD SCANNER REPORT" (c) 1991-2; V2N2 - February, 1992; Page 7 



clip, wrist strap, wall charger, and rain cap. A number 
of accessories are available such as a desktop charger 
that will quick charge the battery pack in an hour. 

In a head-to-head comparison with an AR-1000XC, the 2SRA 
more than held it's own in all areas, despite the use of 
band-specific antennas on the AR-1000XC. The 2SRA has a 
smorgasbord of features not available in other handheld 
scanners. Needless to say, the 2SRA blows the R-1 away. 
If you appreciate a dual receiver with a transmitter, 
CTCSS Squelch, wide band scanner & want others to ask why 
your radio has 2 antennas, check out the ICOM 2/4SRA. 

I COM W2A The 2/4SRA is a superb stand alone scanner 
if you don't have an amateur radio license. If you are a 
ham, the 2/4SRA's sister, the W2A, has many of the same 
features and the plus that it's a 2/70 DUAL BANDER. A 
drawback is fewer channels. The W2A is not advertised as 
a wideband rig but a simple keyboard sequence unlocks 
much the same coverage as the 2/4SRA. Check out this new 
series before the government legislates it into oblivion! 

REVIEW OF ALINCO DJ-X1 from GEnie Information Systems 
Radio RoundTable BBS; page 200 
Category 4, Topic 32 

Message — Fri Nov 22, 1991 at 00:14 EST 

By: Stuart Logan, N7QYJ (Edited for clarity/brevity) 

ALINCO, known in the USA for amateur radio products, has 
announced their first scanner receiver. Dubbed the DJ-X1, 
this handheld scanner is expected to be released this 
year in Europe. The unit has the same 4.3" x 2.1" x 1.5" 
chassis as their recently introduced DJ-F1(4)T amateur 
radios. One of the more innovative features of this 
family of radios is how the battery pack slides (full- 
length) on to the back of the rig! A 700 mAh NiCad pack 
and a 6-AA cell pack are available. In Europe, the DJ-X1 
will come standard with the dry cell pack. Configuration 
& availability in the US market have not been disclosed. 
Here are the specs for the European version: 

Modes: AM, FM Narrow, FM Wide 
Steps: 5,9,10,12.5,20,25,30,50,100 KHz 
Antenna: 50 ohm wideband/BNC 
Weight: 13.2 oz 

Conversion: AM/FM Triple Conversion 
Sensitivity: NBFM -8db (12db SINAD) (????/ED) 

AM -2db (10db S/N) (????/ED) 
Current Drain: 24 mA 
Freq. Coverage: 500 KHz - 1.3 GHz 
Channels: 100 in banks (bank size not specified) 

As reviewed in a leading Japanese radio magazine, this 
radio has "sensitivity far better than its obvious 
rivals". Stay tuned for more on another R-1 alternative. 

*z*z*z*z*ziz*z*z*ztz*z*z*z*z1fz*z*z*z*z*z*ztz1(z*z*z*z*z*z* 

THE MAIL BOX WITH QUESTIONS FROM THE READERS 

*i*:*;*:*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*;*:*=*;*=*=*r*:*:*i*i*i*:*i*=*=*=* 

Dear Bill: Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. My wife 
gave me a Uniden Bearcat BC-170. I use it with a GRE 


Super Converter II that I got from CRB Research Books, 
which brings 800 MHz down to 400 MHz. In your Scanner 
Modification Handbooks. Vols 1 & 2 . you talk about the 
BC-950XLT, 200/205XLT and 760XLT. I would like to know 
why there isn't any info on the BC-170? I will look for 
any information you can give me in the "WORLD SCANNER 
REPORT". Thanks again Bill, you are a never-ending 
source of information. Take care, H.B. Dragonetti 

EDITOR'S REPLY: Thank you; I sure hope to never end the 
flow of information, that's for sure. If I do, it will 
be because either I am dead or the government found some 
reason to take me away from the Monitoring Scene! So 
far, so good on both counts. Henry, I can't possibly 
work on and develop specific mods for every "Tom, Dick S 
Harry" scanner that comes on to the scene. I have to 
confine my attentions to the more popular units and those 
which offer good capabilities in the first place. This 
excludes MOST scanners from my immediate attention right 
off the bat. I have neither the time nor the resources 
to check out the wide variety of scanners now available. 
I've never seen a BC-170; nor do I have a Service Manual 
for it in my files. If you peruse the back issues of the 
"WSR", you will see where I include retrofit data for as 
many scanners as I can. This is possible mostly from the 
Service Manuals that I have on file. If you will procure 
and send me a copy of the BC-170 Manual, I will sure 
include it for future mods as best as I can. 73/bc 

Dear Mr. Cheek: I enjoyed reading the "WSR" the past 
year and look forward to the 1992 issues. I have two 
questions about my PRO-34 scanner. I am pleased with 
this scanner except for an annoying problem that has 
frequently developed. I have reread my back issues of 
"WSR" and have not seen evidence of anyone else with the 
the same problem. Four times in the past two years I 
have had to disassemble my PRO-34 to fix this recurring 
problem. The problem is that it takes an increasing 
amount of effort (pressure) when I press a button on the 
keyboard, for a number or function to appear on the LCD 
and the beep to sound. The most frequently used buttons; 
SCAN, MANUAL, 1,0 and 5 are the first to stop working 
properly. Over a short period of time (several weeks) 
the problem gets progressively worse and finally the 
entire keyboard is inoperative, no matter how hard I 
press the buttons. I checked to make sure the "Key Lock” 
switch is in the "off” position. The only solution I 
have found to fix this problem is to disassemble the 
scanner and rub the area of the logic PC Board (that is 
directly under the keyboard buttons) with 
cleaner/degreaser. The scanner will then work like new 
for another four to six months. I do not abuse the 
scanner. It is either at home or secured to a mobile 
bracket when in my car. I store the scanner in a 
carrying case when not in use.I am curious as to what 
controls the memory storage of the frequencies in the 
PRO-34. I have had unpredictable results with memory 
storage the times I have disassembled to scanner to fix 
problems or make modifications. I have lost the 200 
channel memory after having the scanner disassembled for 
only 25 minutes. (Continued on Page 10) 


"THE WORLD SCANNER REPORT" (c) 1991-2; V2N2 - February, 1992; Page 8 















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World Scanner Report V2 n£ 
SUPPLEMENTARY PAGE 12 


COMMtronics Engineering 
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<Cont from Page 8) I was careful not to hit the "Reset 
Button". Other times the scanner has been apart for 
almost two hours and after reassembly 1 was surprised to 
find the 200 channel memory was retained. Obviously, it 
is a real pain to reenter the 200 frequencies. I would 
like to avoid reprogramming the next time I have to work 
on the scanner. 

Is the memory storage related to how long the scanner is 
apart and disconnected from the power supply or does 
memory storage depend on if the various connectors (CN1, 
CN101, CN102,) are disconnected or if the Logic PC Board 
is disconnected from the Linear PC Board (CN2, CN103)? 
Thank you for your time in answering my questions. 
Sincerely, Doug Michaels 

EDITOR'S REPLY: Good questions! Evidently, the 
conductive rubber keypad of your PRO-34 is deteriorating 
at a slow rate, or some form of pollution is oxidizing 
the metallic contacts on the PCB. Either one would be 
caused by an environmental factor in your operating area, 
possibly a higher than normal concentration of ozone or 
other aerosol or gaseous contaminants. The PCB should be 
good for a long time to come with periodic cleaning as 
necessary. The rubber keypad should be replaced right 
away, though, since either it is severly contaminated or 
possibly defective with contaminants from manufacture. 
Order the keypad from Tandy National Parts, 800-442-2425, 
for the PRO-34, Cat it 20-135, part ttGE-84D-5283. Polish 
the contacts on the PCB with a pencil eraser and swab 
with alcohol. Allow to thoroughly dry before replacing 
the keypad since alcohol can also destroy rubber. That’s 
about all I can think of relative to that problem. 

Memory in the PRO-34 is something else. I have had 
clients ship me their PRO-34’s without a battery pack and 
then the units sat in my shop for a week before I got 
into them, and lo! Memories intact! The keep-alive 
voltage for the SRAM memory chip is provided by a huge 


electrolytic capacitor, C-4, on the Logic/CPU Board 
which, under normal CMOS drain, is sufficient to retain 
memory for weeks, more than likely. When you invade the 
unit and solder around here and there, or touch various 
spots, it is possible to short C-4 or prematurely drain 
it, and POOF goes the memory. You'll have to use great 
care to avoid tampering in any area between the anode of 
D-3 & C-4 to the CPU and SRAM chips, which means MOST of 
the Logic/CPU Board. Use the schematic diagram in the 
Service Manual to trace the areas just mentioned. The 
mere act of tearing the scanner down is not sufficient to 
cause memory loss. I've had removed PCB's on my bench 
for days without losing memory. Other times, it's been 
zapped in a second. Use care. 73/bc 

Dear "Doc": I would like to do the Modest Memory Upgrade 
as described in "WSR" V1N7, Aug 1991, pp 2-3. My question 
is: if I have, for example, Ch-13 "locked out" of the 
original 16k SRAM, when I switch in the new SRAM, will 
channel 13 be locked out there also? This question would 
apply to DELAY, MODE, RESET, 40 for example, or are the 
extra commands independent of each other in each SRAM. I 
thank you in advance. Bob Horvath 

EDITOR'S REPLY: Depends on whether you're doing this mod 
to a PRO-2004/5/6 or ANY other radio! You didn’t say. 
The PRO-2004/5/6 series stores virtually all custom 
settable data in the SRAM chip along with the channel S 
freq data. Hence Ch-13 locked out in one Block won't be 
locked out in another. All other scanners store this 
custom data in the RAM on board the CPU, which can't 
possibly know the stock Block of channels from an 
extended Block; hence all Ch-13's would be locked out. 
The PRO-2004/5/6 does store PRIority CM # and selected or 
locked out Scan Bank data in the CPU's RAM, so those 
functions will be common to all Memory Blocks. No Big 
deal. Most all other scanners store ONLY freq & Ch # in 
the memory chip and all other settings in the CPU RAM. 
The PRO-2004/5/6 are exceptional exceptions here. 73/bc 


"THE WORLD SCANNER REPORT" (c) 1991-2; V2N2 - February, 1992; Page 10 


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FIRST CLASS MAIL 


t Cellular Mobile Telephone Data Decoder Now Available! 

+ EDITORIAL FOR 1992 
+ HSR Directions for 1992 

+ Conclusion of the FatMan Scanner/Computer Interface 
t Operating the FatMan Scanner/Computer Interface 
t Remote Controller Unit for PRO-2004/5/6; concluded from last month 
+ Review of ICOM 2SRA & 4SRA 
+ Review of Alinco DJ-X1 

+ Letters from the Readers; PRO-34 & Memory Problems; Extended Memories